What Men Dare Do! "O, what men dare do! What men may do! What men daily do, not knowing what they do!"

23Oct/108

Men as Feminists

Men as Feminists

I have to admit, I'm not particularly interested in the debate, which seems to spring up in the feminist blogosphere every now and then again, over whether or not men can be feminists, or if we should take on another title, such as "pro-feminist" or "feminist allies."  I prefer "recovering chauvinist" myself, but I suspect it's not really a winner for image politics.  Heh.

Should men expect to be treated as full members of (broadly speaking) the feminist community once they proclaim their self-identified feminism?  Of course not.  Feminists have every right to be wary of men purporting to be feminists and joining their community.  I would suspect, though my experience is limited, that a lot of male feminists are just a slightly more mature or clever version of "nice guys," trying to get involved in feminism for purposes quite at odds with actual feminism.

But that is, in some ways, the point of this blog and creating a space like this: here's the place where men can talk about male feminism, about masculinities, about gender and the patriarchy.  We don't need to subvert feminist safe spaces to engage in these kinds of discussions when we can create our own safe spaces, right here.

What's important to remember is male feminists aren't some sort of exception to the general rule of a patriarchy.  We aren't outside the patriarchy.  We're part of it, we participate in it and we contribute to it -- we just do so a bit more knowingly.  However flip I might be in using the term recovering chauvinist, it's not an inaccurate description.  Like a recovering alcoholic or drug addict, we're never "cured" of our addiction.  But moreover, unlike a recovering addict, it's not as easy to become "recovering."  If an alcoholic stops drinking, or a drug addict stops using, then they can begin the road to recovery.  For men, there's no simple binary of ceasing to do a thing and thereby start recovering.  Internalized and externalized sexism is not an easy foe to slay -- there's no "off" button to make it go away.

The sad truth of male feminism is that it never "goes away."  No one person can conquer the patriarchy, and I would be very suspicious of any man who would claim to have bested the pressures of society and history and be "recovered."

But as to the point of this post: I can't say I really care for these arguments about whether or not men can call themselves feminist.  A chauvinist man can no more call himself a feminist than Sarah Palin can.  Feminism to me, means accepting certain principles of politics, culture, relationships, at the broadest society down to your own individual level, in a never-finished attempt to master the sexism that the system put in us.  If you can give that a shot, any person can be a feminist.

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